EducationRacial Equity

What can we learn from teachers in the U.S. Civil Rights Movement?

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Civil Rights Movement
"Civil rights march on Washington, D.C. / [WKL]." Original black and white negative by Warren K. Leffler. Taken August 28th, 1963, Washington D.C, United States. Colorized by Jordan J. Lloyd. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

"Always in the back of my mind, I had thought about how if I ever became a professor, I wanted to do research on teachers, to tell their stories about their activism in the civil rights movement."

Derrick Alridge, director of the Teachers in the Movement Project and a professor in the Social Foundations of Education program at the University of Virginia.

The Teachers in the Movement Project, housed in the UVA School of Education and Human Development, gives Alridge – and many others – opportunities to make that vision a reality. Using oral histories to collect and document the experiences and approaches of educators during the U.S. Civil Rights Movement, teachers share their approaches to education, what they studied and taught, and how they advocated for justice and equality outside of school.

Take a moment and listen to the voices of these elders – they share powerful experiences and lessons.

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